Music of Summer #5 “Oye Como Va” by Santana

Music of Summer #5 “Oye Como Va” by Santana

SunUp Solar presents the Summer of Sun, a reminder of all the great activities summer brings like music, food, family & fun. Activities you can greatly increase when your not paying a high and constantly rising  monthly electric utility bill. “Oye Como Va” by Santana “Oye Como Va” is a song written by Latin jazz and mambo musician Tito Puente in 1963 and popularized by Santana’s rendition of the song in 1970 on their album Abraxas, helping to catapult Santana into stardom with the song reaching #13 on the Billboard Top 100. The song also reached #11 on Billboard’s Easy Listening survey and #32 on their R&B chart.[1] It was inspired by Israel “Cachao” Lopez’s “Chanchullo.” The title comes from the first words: Spanish: English: Oye como va Listen to how [it] goes OR Hey, how is it going Mi ritmo “My rhythm” Bueno pa’ gozar “Good for enjoying” or “good to enjoy” Mulata See: Mulatta The fact that the phrase “Oye como va” is the title of the song and is sung somewhat separately from the phrase “mi ritmo” makes it easy to interpret the meaning as “Hey, how’s it going?” However, the first sentence is actually “Oye como va mi ritmo,” meaning “Listen to how my rhythm goes.” Source: Wikipedia   Music of Summer #4 “Future Man, Future Lady” by Ziggy Marley (ft. Laurie Berkner) Music of Summer #3 “Don’t Ask Me No Questions” by Lynyrd Skynyrd Music of Summer #2 “Good Times Roll” by The Cars Music of Summer #1 “Going Up The Country” by Canned...
Music of Summer #4 “Future Man, Future Lady” by Ziggy Marley (ft. Laurie Berkner)

Music of Summer #4 “Future Man, Future Lady” by Ziggy Marley (ft. Laurie Berkner)

SunUp Solar presents the Summer of Sun, a reminder of all the great activities summer brings like music, food, family & fun. Activities you can greatly increase when your not paying a high and constantly rising  monthly electric utility bill. “Future Man, Future Lady” by Ziggy Marley (ft. Laurie Berkner) David Nesta “Ziggy” Marley (born 17 October 1968) is a Jamaican musician and leader of the band, Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers. He is the oldest son of Rita Marley and reggae legend Bob Marley. He and his Melody Makers made a guest appearance on the popular kids television show Sesame Street in the 1991–92 season, and sang a Sesame Street version of “Small People” from their 1991 album Jahmekya In 1996, Marley and the Melody Makers recorded the reggae-style theme song for the children’s television series Arthur called “Believe in Yourself”. He voiced Ernie, one of Sykes’ (Martin Scorsese) Rasta jellyfish henchmen in the 2004 film Shark Tale. In the film when Oscar (Will Smith) tries to sing the Bob Marley song “Three Little Birds”, Marley’s character zaps Oscar on the head and says “That’s not the way you sing that song, mon.” The title song for the film was a cover version of “Three Little Birds” performed by Marley and Sean Paul. Further voice acting includes “Crockadle” on an episode of My Gym Partner’s a Monkey, the Cheshire Cat in a 2010 episode of Wonder Pets, and Reflux the Knaaren, in the Ubisoft video game Rayman 3. Marley covered “Drive” by The Cars for the Adam Sandler movie 50 First Dates, and his father’s song “Three...
Music of Summer #3 “Don’t Ask Me No Questions” by Lynyrd Skynyrd

Music of Summer #3 “Don’t Ask Me No Questions” by Lynyrd Skynyrd

SunUp Solar presents the Summer of Sun, a reminder of all the great activities summer brings like music, food, family & fun. Activities you can greatly increase when your not paying a high and constantly rising  monthly electric utility bill. “Don’t Ask Me No Questions” by Lynyrd Skynyrd The song is memorable for its lyrics and simple guitar riff. Lynyrd Skynyrd, depicting themselves as just working-class musicians who liked making music at the time, were anxious in the world of record companies, managers, and agents. The song is a message to the people who did not want anything to do with the band during their early years, but became demanding when the band became successful. It was written by Rossington and Van Zant during a fishing trip. The song failed to reach chart status; however, their later song “Sweet Home Alabama” achieved worldwide recognition Source: Wikipedia   Music of Summer #2 “Good Times Roll” by The Cars Music of Summer #1 “Going Up The Country” by Canned...
Music of Summer #2 “Good Times Roll” by The Cars

Music of Summer #2 “Good Times Roll” by The Cars

SunUp Solar presents the Summer of Sun, a reminder of all the great activities summer brings like music, food, family & fun. Activities you can greatly increase when your not paying a high and constantly rising  monthly electric utility bill. “Good Times Roll” by The Cars The track was produced by Roy Thomas Baker. Written and sung by Cars lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist Ric Ocasek, it was released as the album’s third single. “Good Times Roll”, along with the rest of the tracks from The Cars, was recorded in just two weeks. However, the album’s chart success was so long-lived that the release of its follow-up, 1979’s Candy-O, was delayed. The song begins with electronic drums and a guitar riff, soon joined by Ocasek’s lead vocals and synthesizers by keyboardist Greg Hawkes. Despite the up-tempo-sounding title, “Good Times Roll” is a mid-tempo song, with a beat described as “languid,” “psychedelic” and “creepy.” The lyrics are similarly described as “withering” and Ocasek’s vocal style as “clinical.” Source: Wikipedia Music of Summer #2 “Good Times Roll” by The...
Music of Summer #1 “Going Up The Country” by Canned Heat

Music of Summer #1 “Going Up The Country” by Canned Heat

SunUp Solar presents the Summer of Sun, a reminder of all the great activities summer brings like music, food, family & fun. Activities you can greatly increase when your not paying a high and constantly rising  monthly electric utility bill.  “Going Up The Country” by Canned Heat Canned Heat, who were early blues enthusiasts, based “Going Up the Country” on “Bull Doze Blues”, recorded in 1928 by Texas bluesman Henry Thomas. Thomas was from the songster tradition and had a unique sound, sometimes accompanying himself on quills, an early Afro-American wind instrument similar to panpipes. He recorded “Bull Doze Blues” in Chicago on June 13, 1928 for Vocalion Records (no. 1230). For “Going Up the Country”, Canned Heat’s Wilson used Thomas’ melody on the quills and his basic rhythm, but arranged it for a rock setting and rewrote the lyrics. In addition to the bass and drum rhythm section, Henry Vestine supplied a “light electric rhythm guitar” and multi-instrumentalist Jim Horn reproduced Thomas’ quill parts on the flute. Although linked to the counterculture of the 1960s’ back-to-the-land movement, Wilson’s lyrics are ambiguous: Now baby pack your leaving trunk, you know we’ve got to leave today Just exactly where we’re going I cannot say, but we might even leave the U.S.A. ‘Cause there’s a brand new game that I wanna play Source:...